Mosha the Elephant

Unseen about Mosha the Elephant

elephant_fake_leg_1363374c.jpg

WORDS

false

step – stepped

landmine

remove

front

hurt

difficult

painful

worried

find out- found out

can – could

metal


scared

take off

put it back on

grow

enough

carry

weight

Practice the new words on Quizlet

Mosha the three-legged elephant gets a new prosthetic leg after stepping on a landmine

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Mosha, a ten-year-old female, was brought to the Friends of the Asian Elephant Hospital in Thailand when she was just seven-months old after stepping on a landmine in 2007. She was injured and her right leg was removed. Her left leg was also injured but it later healed.

Veterinarians were afraid she would not recover because she avoided food and the company of other elephants when she first arrived. So they searched for a solution. A chance meeting with Dr Therdchai Jivacate, who makes prosthetic legs for humans, led him to create a special leg for her. While he had fitted over 16,000 prosthetic limbs on humans, the doctor had never made one for an elephant before. She became the first elephant in the world to receive a prosthetic limb.

“If she cannot walk, she is going to die,” he said in 2009.

Mosha is growing so fast, that she recently had to be re-fitted with a bigger leg. Thanks to Dr. Jivacate, Mosha leads a normal life in the jungles of Northern Thailand, eating in excess of 200 lbs of food every day, exercising and taking naps, just like any other elephant!

Elephant Parade

Elephant Parade® is a social enterprise and runs the world’s largest art exhibition of decorated elephant statues. Created by artists and celebrities, each Elephant Parade statue is a unique art piece. The life-size, baby elephant statues are exhibited in international cities and raise awareness for the need of elephant conservation.

Limited edition, handcrafted replicas and a select range of products are created from the exhibition elephants. 20% of Elephant Parade net profits are donated to elephant welfare and conservation projects.

 

 

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